Free sex lines without a credit card

The manufacturing process started by first applying the magnetic stripe to the preprinted plastic cards via the hot stamping process developed by the IBM IRD engineers.This operation of applying the magnetic stripe to the plastic cards was done off line in another area of IBM IRD and not in the secured area.

In 1960, IBM used the magnetic tape idea to develop a reliable way of securing magnetic stripes to plastic cards, under a contract with the US government for a security system.

A number of International Organization for Standardization standards, ISO/IEC 7810, ISO/IEC 7811, ISO/IEC 7812, ISO/IEC 7813, ISO 8583, and ISO/IEC 4909, now define the physical properties of the card, including size, flexibility, location of the magstripe, magnetic characteristics, and data formats.

This conversion enabled the 360 computer to monitor and control the entire production process the IRD engineers designed and built. This tightly secured area with limited access was required because of the sensitivity of the data that would ultimately be used to encode and emboss the credit and ID cards.

The engineering design/build effort was carried out in a raised floor secured area of IBM IRD in Dayton, N. The IRD engineers first had to develop a reliable process of hot stamping the magnetic stripe to the plastic cards.

When he explained the source of his frustration: inability to get the tape to "stick" to the plastic in a way that would work, she suggested that he use the iron to melt the stripe on. The major development of the magnetic striped plastic card began in 1969 at the IBM Information Records Division (IRD) headquartered in Dayton N. In 1970, the marketing organization was transferred by IBM DPD back to the Information Records Division in order to begin sales and marketing strategies for the magnetically striped and encoded cards being developed.

It took almost two years for IBM IRD engineers to not only develop the process for reliably applying the magnetic stripe to plastic cards via a hot stamping method, but also develop the process for encoding the magnetic stripe utilizing the IBM Delta Distance C Optical Bar Code format.After the 360 performed a check to verify that all systems and stations were loaded and ready to go, the computer began feeding the Magnetic Striped Plastic Cards from the hoppers at the front end of the production line down a motorized track.The entire operation was fully automated and controlled by the modified IBM 360 business computer.The line consisted of the following stations and operations: This completed the manufacturing line for the magnetic striped encoded and embossed plastic credit and badge access cards.The envelopes were then taken to be posted and mailed directly to the customers of the companies who had ordered the cards from IRD.The cards were then brought into the secured area and placed in "hoppers" at the beginning of the production line.